Ars Poetica

I have read this term before, but it wasn’t until last night that I got to learn more about it. It was our last class with Georgia Heard in this series of classes. She taught us that Ars Poetica is a term for a poem that is a meditation on the art of poetry, the poet’s beliefs about poetry, where poems are found, or what poetry could be in an individual’s life. This form of poetry dates back to Horace in 65 B.C.E. and has been part of poetic literature ever since. We read Ars Poetica by Pablo Neruda, Lucille Clifton, Jose Olivares, and Georgia Heard.

I am a beginner on this road; a novice at poetic forms and techniques; an emerging reader and writer of poems. I’m enjoying being a learner and am trying new things in my writing. This community has contributed to my having courage to do this.

Georgia gave us an exercise which I will share. Perhaps your students would take these questions and create something truly wonderful.

  • What kind of animal is your inner poet?
  • Who does your inner poet speak to?
  • What does your inner poet say?

In our group, these were the animals chosen: lion, spider, wolf, owl, haw, doe, deer, sparrow, striped bumblebee, and hummingbird. It was remarkable that there was so much variety. We did it as a quick write in the moment. Here is what I wrote last night. It is a DRAFT, at best, but I share it to give you an idea of something you might try.

Ars Poetica

My inner poet is a great blue heron
standing still in hidden wetlands.

It speaks to the tides flowing in and out.
It speaks to quiet souls who weep.

It says, Be patient.
Wait for the miracle. Watch and wait.

Thank you to all at Two Writing Teachers who support teacher-writers in growing as writers.

Form

As a music student, I was introduced to the concept of musical forms such as the sonata, fugue, or symphony. My teacher felt that a study of form across disciplines plus a study of how to listen would provide a deep education for anyone who pursued that path. I became a better listener of music when I knew more about form.

Fast forward nearly 50 years and I am back in the study of form. This time poetic form. My task this week was to write a poem in a form created by Marilyn Singer called a Reverso. You can read about the form and her poetry here. I have struggled to write such a poem, but I did learn a practice technique that helped me.

First, draft your thoughts.

Next, write words, phrases, or sentences on strips of paper (1 line of poetry per strip).

Then, play with the strips. Change the sequence or tear it in half to make two lines. Discard unnecessary language. Add necessary language or revised language.

Finally, decide on the order that becomes the poem you want to write.

Publish.

My poem-draft is too rough to share here, but below is a picture of my workspace. This practice technique took away some of the frustration and fear associated with writing a reverso. Maybe it will help you or your students with their poetry!

Bread Baking

So

Many

Memories

Returning today

As we make bread dough

Cup by cup with water

Yeast, flour, sugar, salt, and oil.

Soon our senses will burst with smells

And tastes of homemade goodness and love.

Thank you to Two Writing Teachers for this month of stories.

Poems in the Chat

For many of us, Zoom and similar platforms have been a blessing and a curse. For me, Zoom has been mostly a blessing which has allowed me to make new friends and stay in touch with family.

The chat function is an interesting feature. It can enhance what it being said; it can hold questions; it can provide humorous asides (or snarky comments); it can provide links for further study. In my experience with my writers group at TeachWrite, the chat does all of these things. Sometimes, serendipitous things happen.

One night, a group member was listing her writing goals for the week and ended with “and a partridge in a pear tree.” We all laughed. Next up, the science teacher. He listed his goals, but shook his head when others tried to add the partridge to his list. A chat opportunity opened!

I started with “A falcon in a fir tree?”
Someone else followed with “An owl in an oak tree?”
Then, “A sparrow in a spruce?”
And, “A cardinal in a conifer?”

I realized in that moment, my community of writers had extemporaneously collaborated on a small poem-ish text. It was a moment of happiness for me. I felt I belonged.

Image from Pixaby.com

March 31, 2020

Only the explosion of blossoms and buds,

Only the shouts of children playing games,

Only the love from my children and grandchildren,

Only the connection with friends on Zoom,

Only the walks among trees and along rivers,

Only the kind helpers in neighborhoods,

Only the words shared on these pages,

Only the music and poetry,

Only the walls of home,

Only time,

Only this.

This is not small.

Thank you to the amazing educators at TWO WRITING TEACHERS who give so much of their time and talent to supporting students and teachers. I’m forever grateful.



March 2020 Slice of Life Writing Challenge